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Humanities and Social Sciences

Faculty of
Humanities and Social Sciences

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    ARHI 201 / HIST 203 is designed to introduce the developments in artistic expression, from cave drawings and the monuments of ancient Egypt to the paintings, sculpture and architecture of 15th century northern Europe.

    Art History 202/History 204: Looking at Art from the Renaissance to Present Day is a three-credit, junior-level course designed to introduce you to the developments in artistic expression in the Western world beginning with the Italian Renaissance and ending with Contemporary art. This course, which is offered in an individualized-study delivery mode and normally open to students throughout the year, introduces the basic premise of art history and teaches students how to critically view historical works and artistic practices.

    Art History 301 / Cultural Studies 301: Canadian Visual Culture is a three-credit, senior-level course designed to familiarize you with a variety of critical perspectives and help you understand display practices and cultural production in the context of Canadian art history.

    Art History 301 / Cultural Studies 301: Canadian Visual Culture is a three-credit, senior-level course designed to familiarize you with a variety of critical perspectives and help you understand display practices and cultural production in the context of Canadian art history.

    ENGL 255 focuses on essay writing at the university level. In order to improve the necessary skills, students study examples of good writing, do a brief introductory assignment, write two short summaries, participate in online discussion forums, and complete three essays covering a spectrum of styles and purposes.

    ENGL 211 introduces students to four literary forms: the short story, essay, novella, and novel.

    ENGL 211 introduces students to four literary forms: the short story, essay, novella, and novel. By examining specific works and the accompanying commentaries in two study guides, students encounter major literary concepts and terms, as well as key authors and works from British, Canadian, and American literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Among the authors studied in this course are Charles Dickens, Ernest Hemingway, Margaret Laurence, William Faulkner, Katherine Mansfield, Alistair MacLeod, Joseph Conrad, and George Orwell.

    ENGL 212 introduces forms of poetry, with a wide variety of examples from Shakespeare to Atwood, examining themes, structure, style, and imagery.

    English 212: Plays and Poetry is a three-credit, junior level course similar in structure to many introductory university English courses. It typically follows a course in prose forms, such as Athabasca University’s English 211, and assumes an acquaintance with literary forms and techniques.

    ENGL 255 focuses on essay writing at the university level. In order to improve the necessary skills, students study examples of good writing, do a brief introductory assignment, write two short summaries, participate in online discussion forums, and complete three essays covering a spectrum of styles and purposes.

    This course introduces students to the Canadian literary tradition—major authors, works, forms, periods, movements, and concerns—from colonial times to the present. Works are chosen primarily from English-Canadian authors, although a number of French-Canadian works are studied in translation.

    This course traces the history of Western theatre from its Greek origins to the beginning of the eighteenth century in England and France, with specific references to the plays in a core anthology, The Harcourt Brace Anthology of Drama.

    English 304: A History of Drama Part II: Modernist Theatre is a senior-level university course which examines the beginnings of Western modernism in plays of the nineteenth and twentieth century from Europe, Britain, the United States, and Canada.

    English 305: Literature for Children is a six-credit senior course designed to introduce the student to children’s literature, its history and development, and its rich variety of forms and techniques.

    ENGL 306 is an introduction to literature created by people who do the actual work being depicted. This is a relatively new genre. In the past, most literature about the workplace was written by outsiders; by people who had never done the job and who therefore did not have an insider's knowledge of what actually went on in the daily life of workers. In breaking the taboo against depicting the realities of life on the job, the literature of work gives an exciting new perspective both on the workplace and on the possibilities of literature.

    English 307 critically examines the tradition in women's writing, deconstructs the pervasive images of women in literature, and analyses the way in which women use language to define their experiences.

    English 316 is an introductory level course designed to familiarize you with a variety of critical perspectives and help you understand literary works more profoundly by integrating literary theory in your response to these works. English 316 also aims to prepare English program students for English 423: Advanced Literary Theory and Criticism, which deals with some of the more contemporary literary theories covered in English 316 in more depth.

    ENGL 324 is an introduction to the study of the plays of William Shakespeare and focuses on the histories and tragedies. Critical analysis of the works helps the student to comprehend the plays and to appreciate the achievement of the most important author in the literary tradition of the English- speaking world. The course will help you study the plays as literary texts and as live theatre. To critically analyse the plays we will use a variety of media: the printed texts of the plays, CDs of performances, the study guide with historical and critical commentary and DVD performances of two plays. The seven plays are: Richard II, Henry IV, Part One, Hamlet, King Lear, Antony and Cleopatra, Macbeth, and Othello.

    ENGL 325 is an introduction to the study of the plays of William Shakespeare and concentrates on the comedies and problem plays. The course will help you to interpret the plays as literary texts and as live theatre.

    English 341: World Literature is a senior-level, six-credit course that introduces you to literature from around the world. The course begins with a concise history of the origins and development of world literature from the eighteenth century to the present. The remainder of the course facilitates the reading of canonical texts from the ancient world to today and from all corners of the globe. Each unit of the course encourages a comparative understanding of world literature by situating culturally specific texts in global contexts and reading the formal and thematic resources of literary texts in historical perspective.

    This course introduces students to American literature, its history and development, and its rich variety of forms and techniques. It surveys American literature from its beginnings to approximately 1900 and includes Native orators, Puritan authors, writers of the Enlightenment and Romantic periods, slave narratives, and works that would set the stage for the entry of the United States into the literary world of the Twentieth Century.

    This course introduces students to American literature, its history and development, and its rich variety of forms and techniques. It surveys American literature from its beginnings to approximately 1900 and includes Native orators, Puritan authors, writers of the Enlightenment and Romantic periods, slave narratives, and works that would set the stage for the entry of the United States into the literary world of the Twentieth Century.

    English 345: American Literature II, a three-credit senior course designed to follow the introduction to American literature begun in Athabasca University’s English 344, continuing the exploration of the history and development of American literature, and its rich variety of forms and techniques. The course takes as its focus works of American literature written from approximately 1900 to 1950.

    ENGL 351 is an introduction to the study of ethnic minority writing in Canada in the context of the country's two majority traditions—the English and the French.

    Welcome to English 353: Intermediate Composition, a senior-level, three-credit course that will help refine your essay writing. This course takes a practical approach to essay writing by having students apply the major principles of composition in five essay assignments. Students learn these principles in the abstract by studying online handbooks on composition and in practice by studying samples of good writing and applying the principles in their own work. The course emphasizes some common essay types—exposition, comparison/contrast, persuasion, and research—as well as having the students write a critical review. Furthermore, students will write a research proposal in order to receive preliminary feedback on the research essay—the assignment with the highest grade weight and, arguably, the most complexity.

    ENGL 353 takes a practical approach to the art of essay writing by having students apply the major principles of composition in five essay assignments.

    Students learn these principles in the abstract by studying a handbook on composition and in practice by studying samples of good writing and by applying the principles in their own work.

    English 353 is a 3-credit course, and is part of the English Program at Athabasca University.

    This course is a genre-specific study of the poetry, prose, short fiction, and novels of the Harlem Renaissance. In this course you will focus on the cultural, historical, and artistic movement of the 1920s and 1930s, by examining the racial, political, and social issues of the time period.

    English 373 is designed to introduce students to the study of the relationships between literary and cinematic forms. We look at the links between the novel and film, the theatre and film, the fairytale and film, poetry and film, with a final unit on the film-novel. Students explore issues pertaining to each medium as well as larger questions related to style, adaptation, translation, and interpretation. We study several primary texts in detail, view several films and read work by some representative literary and film theorists and historians.

    Welcome to English 381: Creative Writing in Prose. The focus of this course is your work and its development. This course does its best to encourage the values of engagement, patience, and perseverance, but its main role is to firm up and expand your sense of technical understanding as you shape the material that arises for you within the various assignments.

    English 384: Writing Creative Non-fiction is a senior-level course that offers students the opportunity to write creative non-fiction and receive feedback on their writing. Creative non-fiction, also called literary non-fiction or literary journalism, is a genre that applies to non-fiction the principles of storytelling usually associated with fiction. Students will learn these principles of storytelling as they produce their own work.

    English 387: Writing Speculative Fiction aims to develop your speculative fiction (SF) writing skills through a combination of strategic study and writing activity.

    English 387: Writing Speculative Fiction aims to develop your speculative fiction (SF) writing skills through a combination of strategic study and writing activity.

    In this course we will focus on the first four decades of the twentieth-century British novel, its history and development, its rich variety of forms and techniques, and the ideas and events that influenced it.

    This course introduces the student to some of the major English novels of the nineteenth century. Starting with Pride and Prejudice (1812), it moves chronologically through the century, examining the development of fiction through such representative works as Frankenstein (1818), Jane Eyre (1847), Wuthering Heights (1847), Vanity Fair (1847-1848), Bleak House (1853), North and South (1855), Barchester Towers (1857), Middlemarch (1867), The Way of All Flesh (1884, 1904), and Tess of the d'Urbervilles (1891). This survey covers various types of fiction from the novel of manners, the Gothic romance, and the historical romance, to satiric, comic, and tragic novels.

    Note: Since this is a senior course, we expect students to have good reading and writing skills as well as the basic critical tools and knowledge of literary forms and techniques that are acquired in an introductory university English literature course like Athabasca University's English 211 and 212. Students who do not have the recommended credits in an introductory English literature course may experience significant difficulty with the essay assignments and examinations.

    This course uses selected literary texts to study the theme of mankind's search for spiritual and intellectual self-realization. Works of different genres by major authors from Canada, England, Germany, and Norway are examined. Through the study of these works, the symbolic figure of Faust is traced from the Renaissance to modern Canada via German Romanticism and nineteenth-century European drama. The course explores the changing image of Faust and examines the cultural and philosophical ideas that shaped each age's perception of the search for self.

    ENGL 423 examines the major contemporary theories of literature and their application in practical criticism.

    ENGL 451 is a further study of Canada’s ethnic minority writing in the context of the ongoing discourse between English Canada and Quebec. Among the topics to be examined are the nature of Canada’s national literature, racial questions, the diversity of Canadian culture, nationalism in both English Canada and Quebec, and identity.

    English 458: The Latin American Novel focuses on five Latin American novels and a memoir offered in translation. Texts are provided in English, but should students choose to read the novels in the original Spanish or Portuguese, they may do so at their own expense.
    ENGL 475 is designed to introduce students to the study of the relationships between literary forms and digital media. Hypertext is composed of blocks of words, screens and images linked together electronically through multiple paths. Unlike the printed text, hypertext can only exist electronically. This course is organized into three parts: hypertext as an artistic medium, the politics of hypertext, and hypertext and literary studies. Please note that English 475 has an online home page with many important reading assignments and links. The 475 home page can be reached through the course syllabus, click course web site, or by dialing URL below:
    http://www.athabascau.ca/courses/engl/475/
    Remember to make your postings on this discussion forum.
    Advanced Fiction Writing
    Students in ENGL 491 complete an extended research project under the direction of a professor. The research topic will be determined by consultation between the student and the professor. The course of study will normally include extensive library research and the production of a major paper. The research proposal will include the goals of the study project, the procedures, and the deadlines for completing the various phases of the work.

    ENGL 492 is designed for students who want to pursue a particular literary topic of study. There is some choice of topic which is limited by the research and teaching interests of the faculty in the Centre for Language and Literature.

    This course is designed for students who need to revise or upgrade their grammar skills to ensure accuracy of communication before proceeding with other courses or post-secondary studies. There is a thorough and systematic review of grammatical structures and their use in authentic language situations. Although this course studies grammar from an ESL perspective, it is also appropriate for native speakers of English who need to improve their grammar skills. ENGL 140 may be recommended for students interested in taking ENGL 177 or ENGL 189.

    This course is designed for students who need a thorough foundation in writing skills before pursuing other courses of study. A developmental approach to the writing process guides students through writing sentences, paragraphs, and an essay. Participation in the editing process helps students to better analyze and improve their own writing skills. This course is appropriate for both ESL students and native speakers of English who require a good grounding in writing, or who need to upgrade their writing skills, before proceeding with further studies. This course may be recommended for students intending to take ENGL 177 or ENGL 187.

    This course is designed for students who need to upgrade and practise their reading skills to improve general comprehension and reading efficiency.

    This course is designed for non-native English speaking students (ESL) who need to improve their speaking and listening skills to ensure accuracy and confidence in communications for academic success, improved employability, and for increased ease in social situations. There is a systematic review of the English sound system; in addition there is individualized attention to accent reduction. The instructor works with students to help them modify their three of four most serious accent problems. Students also complete a comprehensive series of listening exercises because listening is not only an essential communications skill, but many accent issues are related to listening issues. This course may be recommended for students intending to take ENGL 177 or ENGL 187.

    ENGL 155 is designed for students who require a preparatory course in writing skills. The major objective of the course is to improve students' reading and writing abilities so they can succeed at the post-secondary level. Students will expand their vocabulary, increase their ability to analyse complex text, and improve their writing skills. The course includes paragraph and essay structure, and a systematic grammar review.

    ENGL 155 is designed for students who require a preparatory course in writing skills. The major objective of the course is to improve students' reading and writing abilities so they can succeed at the post-secondary level. Students will expand their vocabulary, increase their ability to analyse complex text, and improve their writing skills. The course includes paragraph and essay structure, and a systematic grammar review.

    This course provides an introduction to university studies for students who wish to attend a post-secondary institution where English is the medium of instruction. The aim of this course is to prepare students to succeed in complex academic tasks in writing and reading. This is a general academic preparatory course designed from an ESL perspective. However, it is also appropriate for native speakers of English who are in need of general academic and writing preparation.

    This course provides an introduction to university studies for students who wish to attend a post-secondary institution where English is the medium of instruction. The aim of this course is to prepare students to succeed in complex academic tasks in writing and reading. This is a general academic preparatory course designed from an ESL perspective. However, it is also appropriate for native speakers of English who are in need of general academic and writing preparation.

    This course provides an introduction to business communications for students who wish to attend a post-secondary institution where English is the medium of instruction. The aim of this course is to prepare students to succeed in complex business communication tasks in writing, reading, and listening. This is a preparatory course for students most interested in improving their skills in a business/economic content area or taking further courses in Business related areas. It is designed from an ESL perspective, however, it is also appropriate for native speakers of English who are in need of business writing preparation.

    Welcome to French 100: French for Beginners I, a three-credit, introductory level course designed for students who wish to begin learning French. French 100 will help you become familiar with the foundation of the French language and will help you develop the four basic language skills of reading, writing, aural comprehension, and speaking. By the end of the course you will be able to make simple statements, and ask and answer a variety of questions. You will learn how to write simple sentences that are grammatically correct and to express yourself in simple French.

    FREN 101 continues the study of the basic elements of the French language acquired in FREN 100. Oral and written skills are developed through the study of vocabulary, grammar, and idiomatic expressions. This course will enable students to speak and write in simple French in a range of everyday situations. A basic knowledge of English grammar is very important since FREN 101 contains a major grammar component.

    Welcome to French 200: First-Year University French I, a three-credit university-level course. The aim of this course is to help you improve your French reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. French 200 contains a variety of material and numerous exercises to assist you in enhancing these skills. Because learning a language requires a great deal of practice, it is recommended that you spend several hours per week (at least ten) working through the material. Spending some time each day studying French is a more effective way to learn than trying to memorize a large amount of grammar and vocabulary during the course of a single study session.

    FREN 200 trains the student in spoken and written French as a continuation of FREN 100 and FREN 101. The course enables students to use French in social situations and to talk about themselves, their opinions, and their experiences.

    Welcome to French 201: First-Year University French II, a three-credit university-level course. French 201 is the second part of Athabasca University’s first-year (intermediate) French course and uses the same textbook as French 200. The aim of this course is to help you further develop the French reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills that you learned in French 200. The course will lead you through a major review of grammar, develop your ability to understand and compose short passages, and enable you to use French in social situations to discuss a variety of issues and express your opinions.

    FREN 201 further develops the ability to speak and write French, enabling students to use French in social situations and to talk about themselves, their opinions, and their experiences. In addition, the course leads the student through a major review of grammar and develops the student's ability to understand and compose short passages.

    French Composition

    French 305 presents an historical overview of the development of children’s literature in French and allows you to explore the various genres. Littérature jeunesse focuses on specific problems such as the role of the narrator, the relationship between narrator and reader, the relationship between the text and the illustrations, the evolution of the “hero” and how childhood has been perceived over the years. The course aims to develop skills in literary analysis, written and oral expression in French and also to increase awareness of the complexity and diversity of children’s literature.

    This course forms the first part of an Introduction to French Literature survey course. Through the study of excerpts and full-length works of major French writers, it explores the prose, theatre, and poetry that have marked French civilization from the Middle Ages (Marie de France, Villon) to the 18th century. (Voltaire, Rousseau). The course, which is conducted mainly in French, introduces students to the basic concepts of literary analysis and helps them acquire basic literary and critical terminology. Students are recommended to follow this course with FREN 359 (in development).

    French 362 is designed to follow French 201 or a full first-year university French course. This course continues the study of French grammar, expansion of vocabulary, and the study of short stories selected from francophone literature. The student will improve both written and spoken French through conversation, comprehension, grammar, and composition.

    FREN 375 focuses on the lexical rather than the grammatical aspect of the French language. This course is designed to dramatically increase students' vocabulary level and retention.

    Le cours Français 402 fait simplement l’étude comparative du français et de l’anglais. Il est important que vous vous posiez toujours la question suivante lorsqu’il faudra passer d’une langue à l’autre: De quels moyens dispose-t-on afin de rendre la forme française ou anglaise à partir des idées exprimées? Le manuel du cours présente justement certains moyens à l’aide desquels vous serez en mesure de passer d’une langue à l’autre, surtout d’une pensée anglaise à une expression bien française.

    This course is intended to present translation strategies to students who are proficient in French and have a very good command of English. It is a course in translation practice and translation method which encourages students to be aware of the problems which arise in translating various kinds of texts from French to English and to develop strategies for overcoming these problems. The course helps students increase their awareness of the different ways in which the two languages express concepts. It offers a variety of material for translation including literary, journalistic, consumer-oriented and factual texts, and suggests ways of ensuring that the end product (the translation into English) is both accurate and idiomatic.

    FRENCH 420 is designed for students who intend to major in French or to graduate in Education with French as a teaching subject. This course is also vital to those who intend to pursue translation as a profession and those aspiring towards a higher degree (MA) in French Studies. It serves as an introduction to 19th-Century French poetry and theatre, through the study of (1) a substantial selection of the work of some traditionally well-known male poets, (2) the work of the hitherto little-known women poets, (3) a play chosen from the Romantic period On ne badine pas avec l’amour, which remains popular in contemporary France to this day, and (d) Baudelaire’s Les Fleurs du mal. Baudelairewill be given prominence as a central figure in the evolution of 19th-Century French literary aesthetics, and as a precursor of French symbolist literature. What is particularly innovative about this course is the inclusion of women poets (most of whom have so far been excluded from courses in 19th- Century French literature). These women poets were not only contemporaries to, but indeed close literary associates of, some of the literary giants of 19th-Century France. The one play included in the course suffices to demonstrate the close relationship between poetry and drama in the Romantic period. FREN 358 is the normal pre-requisite for FREN 420.

    FRENCH 421 is designed for students who intend to major in French or to graduate in Education with French as a teaching subject. This course is also vital to those who intend to pursue translation as a profession and to those aspiring towards a higher degree (MA) in French Studies. It serves as an exploration of the 19th-Century novel through the detailed study of three novels: Francois le Champi (George Sand), Eugénie Grandet (Balzac) and Madame Bovary (Flaubert). Although the course focuses on a detailed analysis of only three authors, students will nonetheless be able to expand their horizon through references made to other contemporary novelists such as Chateaubriand, Stendhal, Hugo, Maupassant and Zola.

    Le XVIIe siècle, aussi appelé « le Grand siècle », est l’époque des chefs-d’œuvre de la littérature et du théâtre classiques français. C’est à travers des auteurs tels que Descartes, Pascal, La Fontaine, Madame de La Fayette, Corneille, Molière et Racine pour ne citer que les plus notoires que nous avons appris à comprendre l’être humain, sa grandeur, ses ridicules, sa force, sa faiblesse. Ce sont là nos guides à la sagesse, au rire, au tragique. Sans doute ont-ils voulu eux-mêmes atteindre à l’éternel et à l’universel, exprimer la comédie ou le drame de l’humanité au-delà des temps et des lieux.

    This course is designed for students with little or no knowledge of German. Students learn German speaking, listening, writing, reading, and comprehension skills within the cultural context of Europe today. The course, along with German 203, will enable students to speak and write simple German in a range of everyday situations.

    Welcome to German 203: Introductory German II, a continuation of Athabasca University’s German 202. This course is intended for students who have completed German 202, one semester of university German, or the equivalent. In this course you will reinforce and expand the speaking, listening, writing and reading skills you gained in German 202. On the cultural side, the Fokus section at the end of each chapter in the textbook Wie geht’s? features short literary texts to introduce you to important German authors.
    German 302: Intermediate German I is a three-credit course. According to your individualized-study course contract, you have six months to complete it. We advise you to follow the study schedule included in this Student Manual. If you follow the study schedule, you will have no difficulty in completing the course requirements within the six-month period. However, if you find that you cannot complete the course in this time, consult the current Athabasca University Calendar for information on obtaining an extension to your course contract.

    This course is designed to further develop students’ reading, writing, speaking and listening skills through the use of authentic materials (newspaper articles, letters, interviews, biographies, advertisements, essays, poems, cartoons and short fiction).

    This course introduces students to the basic elements of the Spanish language. Together with its complement SPAN 201, this course will enable a student to speak and write simple Spanish in a range of everyday situations. By viewing 26, half-hour television programs and other material, students will develop oral and written skills through the study of vocabulary, grammar, and idioms. Pronunciation, comprehension, and writing are emphasized and are an essential component of the course. SPAN 200 is a prerequiste for SPAN 201.

    SPAN 300 consists of four integrated components: grammar, vocabulary, culture, and literature. The course reviews and further develops basic language skills acquired in First Year Spanish.

    SPAN 301 consists of four integrated components: grammar, vocabulary, culture, and literature. The course reviews and further develops basic language skills acquired in First Year Spanish. The emphasis is on reviewing and learning grammar structures and on vocabulary acquisition. The objective of SPAN 301 is to strengthen both written and oral skills that will enable students to communicate in a variety of contexts.

    Spanish 330: Textual Analysis and Composition, a three-credit, junior-level Spanish language course. It has been designed to target reading and writing skills while increasing vocabulary and improving grammar.

    SPAN 400 reviews and further develops language skills acquired in the first two years of Spanish. The emphasis is on advanced grammatical structures and on acquisition of more specialized vocabulary. The objective of SPAN 400 is to strengthen both written and oral skills that will enable students to communicate in a variety of contexts with emphasis on achieving an advanced level of mastery of complicated grammar. Students are expected to perform simple literary analysis exercises in this course

    ENGL 255 focuses on essay writing at the university level. In order to improve the necessary skills, students study examples of good writing, do a brief introductory assignment, write two short summaries, participate in online discussion forums, and complete three essays covering a spectrum of styles and purposes.

    ENGL 255 focuses on essay writing at the university level. In order to improve the necessary skills, students study examples of good writing, do a brief introductory assignment, write two short summaries, participate in online discussion forums, and complete three essays covering a spectrum of styles and purposes.

    ENGL 255 focuses on essay writing at the university level. In order to improve the necessary skills, students study examples of good writing, do a brief introductory assignment, write two short summaries, participate in online discussion forums, and complete three essays covering a spectrum of styles and purposes.

    Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) is a course in Criminal Justice, Legal Studies, and Human Services at Athabasca University. This course may be taken on its own, or as part of another program. The course has been designed for individualized study, in which you study at your own pace, with online support and assistance from a tutor, and online submission of your assignments for credit. The course must be completed within six months, although extensions may be granted. It can be completed sooner if you have the time to devote to it.